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Copper Reaction

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Definition of a Reaction
Define a Copper Reaction: A Copper Reaction involves a process in which Copper is mixed with another substance which react to form something else. Reactions are manifested by the disappearance of properties characteristic of Copper and the appearance of new properties in the new substance or Compound. The substances initially involved in a reaction are called reactants or reagents. Copper in moist air slowly acquires a dull green coating because its top layer has oxidised with the air. The most important of the Copper compounds is Copper Oxide.  Copper(I) oxide is referred to as cuprous oxide, while copper(II) oxide is known as cupric oxide. Cuprous oxide is used as a pigment and fungicide.  Cupric oxide is used as a pigment in ceramics and to produce dry cell batteries. Reactions are described with Chemical Equations and Formula.

What do the Roman Numerals mean?
The use of Roman numerals in compounds is based on the indication of the oxidation number (as a Roman Numeral) of each of the major elements in the compound, e.g. iron(III) chloride. There is no space between the element name and the oxidation number.

Copper and Water Reaction
Copper does not react with water. Copper does not react with water because the oxygen in water is locked into a compound with one part oxygen and two parts hydrogen.

Copper Reaction with Oxygen - Copper Oxide
Copper oxide is a compound from the two elements copper and oxygen. Copper in moist air slowly acquires a dull green coating (patina) because its top layer has oxidised with the air. Copper oxide can refer to Copper(I) oxide (cuprous oxide, Cu2O) which is a red powder or Copper(II) oxide (cupric oxide, CuO) which is a black powder. The patina shields the metal from corrosion. Upon strong heating, it forms a black solid of copper oxide.

Copper + Oxygen > Copper(II) Oxide

Copper Sulfate Reaction
Copper sulfate, once referred to as "blue vitriol" and "bluestone", is a copper salt made by the action of sulfuric acid on copper oxide. Copper sulfate is often used to grow crystals in schools and in copper plating experiments to demonstrate the principle of mineral hydration. Copper(II) sulfate is the compound with the formula CuSO4
. Copper usually does not react with most dilute, cold acids. But it will react with concentrated, hot sulfuric acid. Copper Sulfate is used in Fehling's solution and Benedict's solution to test for reducing sugars, which reduce the soluble blue copper(II) sulfate to insoluble red copper(I) oxide.

  • Fehling's Solution: It is used in Fehling's solution and Benedict's solution to test for reducing sugars, which reduce the soluble blue copper (II) sulfate to insoluble red copper(I) oxide. Copper(II) sulfate is also used in the Biuret reagent to test for proteins
  • Benedict's solution: Benedict's solution is used to detect the presence of glucose and other reducing sugars and named after the American chemist S. R. Benedict (1884-1936). It is a blue solution that contains sodium carbonate, sodium citrate, and copper sulfate CuSO4

Copper Nitric Acid Reaction - Copper Nitrate
Copper(II) nitrate is the chemical compound with the formula Cu(NO3
)2and is a blue, crystalline solid. It is to demonstrate chemical voltaic cell reactions. A voltaic cell consist of two different half-cells, connected together to enable the electrons transferred during the redox reaction to produce energy in the form of electricity. Hydrated copper nitrate can be prepared by treating copper metal with an aqueous solution of silver nitrate or concentrated nitric acid. Copper nitrate can react with both dilute and concentrated nitric acid. Copper nitrate can be used to generate nitric acid by heating it until decomposition and passing the fumes directly into water which is similar to the method used in the Ostwald process.

  • The Ostwald process is a chemical process for producing nitric acid, which was developed by the German chemist, Wilhelm Ostwald (1853 1932).

Chemical Reactions
Some examples of a chemical reaction include most commonly burning, fermentation, tarnishing and rusting. There are several different types of Chemical reaction which have been detailed below:

  • Substitution reaction
  • Double displacement reaction
  • Acid-base reaction
  • Combustion reaction
  • Combination reaction
  • Decomposition reaction

Refer to our Chemical Reaction article for additional facts and information providing the different types of reactions, examples of reaction and the Rate of a Chemical Reaction.

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